Present Dei Puzzler stumps all; new challenges

Verbum Dei students and staff were stumped by one of the two questions on last month’s Present Dei Puzzler, so that challenge along with the following two new offerings are available for the current contest.

Question 1:

In the given equation:

a and b represent integers. How many ordered pairs (a, b) satisfy this equation?

Question 2:

Five common five-letter words are hidden in the grid in a continuous closed path that does not cross itself. The five words begin with five consecutive letters of the alphabet. Go from letter to letter horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. What are the five words?

Bonus Carry-Over Question:

Question 2:  Form six 9-letter words by combining two 3-letter blocks below with the endings in the grid.  All blocks will be used.  If one does it correctly, two of the vertical columns will spell a common two-word phrase.

Entries must be submitted in writing to Mr. John Stradley, moderator of The Present Dei, or to Mr. Dan White or to Ms. Sue White, math teachers, by the close of the contest, Wednesday, November 21. Ms. White has assured us that all Verb students, regardless of their level, are prepared to take on this challenge. The first correct answer to each question is worth $2, first correct answer to both questions earns $5. Staff members are encouraged to participate and are eligible for $1 cash prizes.

The first place winner of the previous contest was senior William Cuevas and the runner up was Fr. Michael Mandela, SJ.  The question was: Suppose the positive even numbers are grouped in the following way: {2}, {4,6}, {8,10,12}, {14,16,18,20}, … What is the sum of the numbers in the 15th group?

Correct answer:  3,390

                               

Present Dei Puzzler presented promptly

Current Verbum Dei gentleman and staff are encouraged to demonstrate their logical prowess by answering the following questions: 

Question 1: George and Martha alternately draw one ball at random from an urn containing four red and two green balls. They do not replace any balls that are drawn. If George draws first, what is the probability that George will draw a red ball before Martha does?

Question 2:  Four answers in this small crossword are too long for their spaces and extend past the border by one letter. The four protruding letters, taken clockwise from the top, spell a bonus word. What is this word?

 Across                                         Down

1. Tastes                                      1. Thick carpet

5. 17-syllable poem                    2. Billy Joel’s instrument

6. Vietnam’s capital                     3. Devout

7. Toe woe                                   4. ____ night (summer camp entertainment)

Entries must be submitted in writing to Mr. John Stradley, moderator of The Present Dei, or to Ms. Sue White, math teacher, by the close of the contest, Friday, May 18.  Ms. White is assured that all Verb students, regardless of their level, are prepared to take on this challenge.  The first correct answer to each question is worth $2, first correct answer to both questions earns $5.  All other correct submissions received before the close of the contest will be entered in a drawing for similar prizes.  Staff members are encouraged to participate but are not eligible for cash prizes.

Senior Jared Sanchez won the word search in the most recent puzzler; there were no consolation prizes awarded.  The correct answer for this first puzzler included the following terms: quadrilateral, square, trapezoid, cube, triangle, prism, torus, rectangle, hexagon, circle, sphere, rhombus, cone, pyramid, ellipse, and cylinder.  The remaining letters read:  “Solid with six parallelograms as its faces.”

Senior Rory Riggs won the second puzzler, while junior Omar Melendrez won the consolation prize.  The puzzler is solved using the following: Treat the digits in the top row of the first box as one number:  9    6  becomes 96.  Notice that if you divide 96 by the number in the middle of the box (4) the result is the number at the bottom of the box – 24.  Continuing this pattern means that the missing number is 7 since 12 x 7 = 84.

Present Dei math challenge offers a “two-for”

Current Verbum Dei gentleman and staff are encouraged to demonstrate their logical prowess by answering the following questions: 

For $2:  Consider all of the four digit numbers containing the digits 1 through 4, with no repeats.  (Example of four digit numbers containing the digits 1 through 4 with no repeats:  1342, 2413, 1234, etc.)  What is the sum of all such numbers?

For $5 (entrants must also solve the first problem to be considered):  Consider all of the five digit numbers containing the digits 1 through 5, with no repeats.  What is the sum of all such numbers?

Entries must be submitted in writing to Mr. John Stradley, moderator of The Present Dei, or to Ms. Sue White, math teacher, by the close of the contest, Monday, April 23.  Ms. White is assured that all Verb students, regardless of their level, are prepared to take on this challenge.  A $2 and $5 prize will be awarded to the first gentleman who submits the correct answer to each question; all other correct submissions received before the close of the contest will be entered in a drawing for $2 and $5 consolation prizes.  Staff members are encouraged to participate but are not eligible for cash prizes.

The winners of the March 26 – April 2 contest were seniors Carlos Ruiz and Dylan Hall, who submitted the correct answer of 36 cubes painted blue on exactly one of their faces.

 

“Talk Like a Pirate Day” and 19 new school holidays added to 2012-2013 academic year

By Nhoj Yeldarts, Moderator, The Preposterous Day

Students school wide are likely to be excited about the prospect of twenty additional days off in the upcoming 2012-2013 academic year.  In an effort to recognize a variety of cultural and historical entities, school administration has set a preliminary plan to include 20 additional pupil-free days in the school year.  The archdiocese and state board of education have yet to comment on the prospect, but this move might signal a trend away from the traditional 180-day school year.

“Talk like a Pirate Day” and “National Frozen Food Day,” otherwise known as the birthday of Clarence Birdseye, the father of the frozen food industry, are among the new holidays.  “We can’t really enthusiastically support the ‘Pirate’ day at school,” said Dr. Can O’Donnell, principal.  “Classroom decorum must be maintained, but we can provide an opportunity for our students to celebrate the rich heritage of piracy in their homes and public spaces.”

Other additional holidays include: “Come in from the Cold Day” on January 22, “The Day the Music Died Day” on February 3, which commemorates the events that serve as the basis of Don McLean’s song “American Pie,” and “Tweed Day.”  The latter could never be observed on campus due to dress code standards for students and staff; however, administration is hopeful that tweeds of all stripes will be sported off campus on April 3, 2013.

Physics class to launch rocket from Eagle’s Nest

By Nhoj Yeldarts, Moderator, The Preposterous Day

In a very practical application of theoretical principles, Verb physics students are slated to launch a three stage rocket from the 50-yard line of the sports field on April 1.  The capsule on the third stage is to be manned, no, well, occupied by a chinchilla named Elmer.  The star bound chinchilla is the class mascot, and it will be charged with sub-orbital operations.  “Just to think,” said Mr. H. Eddieston, physics teacher.  “These students were building catapults earlier in the year, and now, they are sending a rocket and a chinchilla to the outer fringe of the atmosphere.”

Fueling of the rocket booster will take place early morning April 1, and students and curious passersby are advised to take precautions not to lean against the liquid nitrogen tanks due to the possibility of flash freezing of clothing and skin.  Dozens of Verb gentlemen wanting to strike the match and “light the candle” that sends the rocket heavenward paid $1 each to be entered into a lottery drawing to be held during the fueling.

Elmer, the astrochinchilla, will safely parachute back to Earth after the rocket reaches its azimuth at the upper edges of the atmosphere.  The physics students have calculated the landing zone to be the infield of the baseball diamond in Ted Watkins Park north of the school.

 

The Present Dei’s math challenge strikes again!

Current Verbum Dei gentleman are encouraged to demonstrate their logical prowess by answering the following question.  Entries must be submitted in writing to Mr. John Stradley, moderator of The Present Dei, or to Ms. Sue White, math teacher, by the close of the contest, Monday, April 2.  Ms. White is assured that all Verb students, regardless of their level, are prepared to take on this challenge.  A $5 prize will be awarded to the first gentleman who submits the correct answer; all other correct submissions received before the close of the contest will be entered in a drawing for a $5 consolation prize.  

A rectangular wooden block measuring 8 in. by 5 in. by 2 in. is painted blue and then cut into 80 cubes, each with faces of 1 in.  How many of these cubes are painted blue on exactly one of their faces?

The winner of the previous contest was senior Carlos Ruiz, who found two correct solutions.  His correct answers were 38176 or 67183.  Correct solutions were also submitted by senior Dylan Hall and sophomore Billy Paredes.

The Present Dei offers its inaugural math contest

Current Verbum Dei gentleman are encouraged to demonstrate their logical prowess by answering the following question.  Entries must be submitted in writing to Mr. John Stradley, moderator of The Present Dei, or to Ms. White, math teacher, by the close of the contest, Monday, March 26.  A $10 prize will be awarded to the first gentleman who submits the correct answer; in the event of a tie, the winner of the cash prize will be drawn from all eligible gentlemen.   

Mr. Stradley, the moderator of The Present Dei, has a set of the digits from 1 to 9 with no repeats.  He chooses five of them and makes a five-digit number that satisfies all of the following conditions:

a.   The fourth digit is double the sum of the third and fifth digits.

b.  The sum of the first and fifth digits equals the sum of the third and fourth digits.

c.  The second digit is the fourth digit minus the third digit.

d.  The sum of the four unused digits is an even number.

What is Mr. Stradley’s number?