Being a Black Man From My Perspective

When I was a young boy, I often asked my parents, “why are you so hard on me and expect so much of me?” They told me that the world would not be kind to me. To be honest with you, I didn’t really know what he was talking about, but I nodded my head anyway.

I grew up playing basketball, but I always knew I wasn’t destined to go to the NBA so I used education as a tool for success. I had never heard anything positive about being an African American male from society. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  is the reason why I’m a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

I wanted to dispel the myth that African American men are uneducated, lazy and don’t take care of their families. I’m neither of what I just described. Is there pressure being a black male? The answer is yes! I feel it every day. I have to work harder than everyone else.  I always have to prove myself and I have to carry myself accordingly. One question I ask all the time is, why do I have to do these things because I’m a black male? It feels like I can never relax for a second. Why is it that people don’t trust black males? They automatically assume the worst from us and don’t let us make a mistake; it’s the end of the world. I love being a black man and all that comes with it. I know who I am, but society judges me differently. Why can’t I wear a hoodie? Why can’t I wear a certain hairstyle? Why am I judged so harshly? Why are the rules different for me? Why do I get pulled over by the police? Why can’t people see me for who I am and not “just” a black man?

I understand it and deal with it accordingly, but what about my young Verb students?  How are they handling it? Are they comfortable in their own skin? Why do teachers teach down to black men?

I would say, I have been very successful throughout my journey. I feel like when I win, we all win, but reality tells me that isn’t the case. As black men our success’ and failures divide us as men. The work environment can feel like a street environment because your success can be another man’s misery, so you have to watch your back? What happened to I win, we all win?

These circumstances make you surround yourself with only like-minded individuals but that again forces us to separate ourselves from each other. In my mind, when President Barack Obama won, I won!  I thought the success of Barack Obama would get people to see me in a different light. I guess I was wrong. I’m not giving up the fight because being a black male is awesome thing to be and I wouldn’t have it in any other way.

The belief in God gets me through my tough days as well as my good days. He knows what my calling Is. I want to thank my parents for preparing me for this world and teaching me to love myself and who I am. For that I am so comfortable in my skin. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as an Alpha I’m carrying out the legacy you started and I promise I won’t let you down. To all of my Fraternity brothers, you guys make it cool to be Black & Educated. Mary Innanculli you gave me my first leadership position at Seton Academy. Brother Tim King founder of Urban Prep Academy you let me shine so bright and let me do my thing from a leadership standpoint. I am so well prepared. Father Privett & Dr. Odom you guys believe in me so much that words cannot express how I feel. I appreciate the both of you because you have let me loose to do positive things and mentor our young men.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *