What am I supposed to do for Lent?

Recently, one of our faculty pointed Verbum Dei’s faculty and staff to a blog by the Jesuits which focused on a central question about this special season…

What am I supposed to do for Lent?

Do you give up things…like chocolate…or sodas? Do you give up alcohol? Do you pray a little more? Do you go to daily mass? … There is a sense in which these are all good things, but there is a definite temptation that can appear when preparing for Lent: It’s easy to make Lent a sort of “Catholic New Year’s Resolution.”

I have to admit that I tend to let Lent be that sort of experience where I want to simply let Lent be a period of denial…because it helps me be different from my normal routine, but in a much simpler form than I probably should venture into.

You should know that I recently decided to join Weight Watchers, which I have decided is a less religious form of Lent.  But clearly, it can be a life changing experience because it helps you change your body in a positive way.  And along that path, you tend to become more positive about yourself, your health and other goals you seek for your life.  But it really is about me…not necessarily about others.

I guess what I want to challenge each of us to do is to experience Lent in a much more positive way.  Verbum Dei’s Campus Ministry team offered up their Lenten Challenge, which I would suggest is a wonderful option for all of us:

Week 1:      Do one good thing each day when no one is watching.

Week 2:      Give up something you love and donate the money you would have spent on that item to a group you want to support for their social justice work.

Week 3:      Read about one justice related current event and tell someone about it.

Week 4:      Write a thank you note or e-mail to someone every day this week.

Week 5:      Pray for someone daily – or pray with someone each day.

Week 6:      Give up one social media platform for one week!  OR post something related to Lent for the week #Lentenchallenge.

Week 7:      Tell a different family member or friend how much they mean to you each day.

Consider what things in your life keep you in the tomb instead of experiencing the resurrection.  I pray that you may find these challenges a more positive approach to Lent, hopefully helping you to encounter Christ within the mystery of the Resurrection—and the little resurrections that renew your life each day.

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