Keeping Black and Brown Boys in Class & Engaged

Research has shown that students who experience discipline that removes them from the classroom are more likely to repeat a grade, drop out of school and become involved in the juvenile justice system. Studies have shown this can result in decreased earning potential and added costs to society, such as incarceration and lost tax revenue.

Boy’s account for 71 percent of all school suspensions. Fifty-nine percent of Black boys and 42 percent of Hispanic boys report being suspended. (U.S. Dept of Ed and Schott Foundation Report)Here are some of the reasons why I feel that Black & Brown boys do not want to be in the classroom or at school.

  • They don’t feel respected by their teachers
  • They don’t feel that they are a welcome member of the school community
  • They don’t have positive relationships with faculty & staff
  • They are not interested in what is being taught
  • They can sense teachers undervalue their intelligence (based on rigor of work and thoughtfulness of lesson plans, etc.)

If you have high quality instruction in every classroom and make sure that the lesson is engaging then boys of color would see school a little different. Also teachers should find a way to get to know their students. Teachers can do this by asking students what they like to do outside of school or attending extracurricular events that their students are involved in. It is also okay to let your students know that you care for them and are concerned about their well-being. Look for ways to let students share their own diverse experiences, whether it’s through spoken word, in conversations, writing or videos. Also they are bothered that some of their teachers don’t understand. Understanding conveys care. Be honest about who you are and your purpose.

Maintain high expectations but throw a dash of love in there. High expectations without nurturing or love will cause a sense of defeat to develop in the boys. You want to show them that you believe that they can reach that goal and that you’re here to help them get there. Be as consistent with positive reinforcements as you are with negative reinforcements—this will build trust. Learning is sustained through trusting the person who is doing the teaching. Some boys of color do not like to admit their educational struggles in fear of being teased by classmates or feeling inadequate. Pride plays a role due to a lack of disconnect between them and their teachers. In some cases, they act out in class because they do not understand the lesson so they are hoping to get put out of class or they ask can they go to the restroom and take their time coming back to class. Our Boys of Color need to be motivated and not have them feel like failures when things do not go well.  We have to keep encouraging and show we care and are there for them. It is a lot going on in their lives that we have no clue about.

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