Teaching all Boys

Here is what I do know:

  • Boy’s account for 71 percent of all school suspensions. Fifty-nine percent of Black boys and 42 percent of Hispanic boys report being suspended.(U.S. Dept of Ed and Schott Foundation Report)
  • Boys comprise 67 percent of all special education students. Almost 80 percent of these are Black and Hispanic males. (USDOE and Schott Foundation Report)
  • Boys are five times more likely than girls to be classified as hyperactive and are 30 percent more likely to flunk or drop out of school. (National Center for Education Statistics)

The goal is to keep our young men out of the street, off their mother’s couch and out of jail. Its crucial as educators we save our young men. Create an open path of communication so parents can come to you with concerns and you can do the same.

Finding the balance of teaching a young man who feels he is going to make it because of his athletic ability and he does not need to be successful in school. This is where a teacher needs not to discourage the young man or prove a point to the young man. Provide him with statistics to help him understand that having an education is just as important in excelling in sports. Punishing our young men, and kicking them out the class is not the way to solve the problem. We have to show our boys as teachers & administrators that we care. Many people in our boy’s life do not care or have given up on them. I always tell the young men that I am here for them and I am willing to help them however I can. Athletics however can be a motivating factor for a young man when it comes to school. Eligibility plays a role at some schools so he has to stay on top of his academics in order for him to play so use that as a tool to help your student-athlete and show that you care that he plays. Showing up to games help develop a good relationship with your student in the classroom.

Boys hear that the way to shine is athletically. And boys get a lot of mixed messages about what it means to be masculine and what it means to be a student. Does being a good student make you a real man? I don’t think so… It is not cool.

I went to an all boys’ high school in Chicago and it really helped me although I was totally against going. That was the first time I had any black male teacher in my life other than my basketball coach. I was truly focused and prepared to go out in the world and be successful. As a teacher I have a great advantage with dealing with boys. I understand what these young males are dealing with and the struggles they face. Many times boys need for someone just to listen. Not only do I consider myself a teacher & coach but also a mentor to the young men. I know when to be tough and I know when they need someone to understand or be an advocate for them.

The Verb

I’ll take this opportunity to introduce myself, as I hope many of you will introduce yourselves to me over the next few months.  I am a native of Los Angeles and a graduate of Loyola High.  I entered the Jesuits right out of high school in 1960 and have never looked back. During my fifty-eight years as a Jesuit, I have served as Principal of Bellarmine College Prep, Provost and Academic Vice President of Santa Clara University and, most recently, as President of the University of San Francisco.  For thirty years I was at the receiving end of Jesuit secondary education and now, at Verbum Dei, I find myself on “production” side of the house, and it’s a great place to be.

As a reader of this blog, you know that 100% of our graduates are accepted into college and that is part of a story that I can only touch on here.  Verb’s academic focus is clear and sharp but it is broader than academics.  Jesuit education aims to develop every aspect of a students—intellectual, spiritual, physical, social.  The Verb offers a full range of competitive athletic teams at the Varsity and JV levels.  Monthly liturgies, students retreats, daily prayer, immersion experiences are woven into the fabric of Verb life.  The menu of student activities and clubs is rich and varied and offers every student the opportunity to explore interests and socialize with classmates.  As a Cristo Rey school, Verbum Dei further develops every students’ professional capacities through a highly structured work experience placement at a local business.  Verbum Dei accomplishes a great deal with its students in a limited amount of time.  Your understanding and support of a Verbum Dei education is key to our success and that of our students.